Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

Marketplace® is the leading business news program in the nation. Host Kai Ryssdal and our team of reporters bring you clear explorations of how economic news affects you, through stories, conversations, newsworthy numbers and more. Airing each weekday evening on your local public radio station or on-demand anytime, Marketplace is your liaison between economics and life. Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal is part of the Marketplace portfolio of public radio programs broadcasting nationwide, which additionally includes Marketplace Morning Report®, Marketplace Weekend®, and Marketplace Tech®. Visit marketplace.org for more. From American Public Media.

11/13/2017: Your next favorite brunch spot could be ... your bank

With the rise of online banking, branches are looking for innovative ways to attract people. One bank in Berlin added a cafe and co-working space, as well as a kids’ corner and a space for gallery exhibitions. Plus, travel insurance is on the rise. And we have reports on dividend cuts at General Electric, the ongoing tax cuts saga and President Donald Trump’s nominee for the Department of Health and Human Services.
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11/14/2017: Forget it Jake, it’s Washington

It’s a tax bill! It’s a healthcare bill! It’s a tax bill! It’s a healthcare bill? Just when we were beginning to fully grasp the Senate’s tax bill, Republicans throw in a repeal of the individual health care mandate. And, trade deficits: the president tweeted that he wants them erased — quickly — but why? Economists talk about ways to bring them down, and we have a report on the oil and gas industry, where one trade deficit could become a surplus. Plus, the bipartisan deal in the works to ease banking regulations, and the health risks of fracking.
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11/15/2017: Who wins the tax bill? People or companies

Last night Senate Republicans made some major changes to their mammoth tax bill, including some improvements for the middle class. But these credits and lower rates are temporary — they would sunset beginning in 2025, and tax cuts for corporations would be permanent. Plus, we talk about changes to the financial regulatory environment under the Trump administration, a potential merger between giants AT&T and Time Warner and play part two of our report on the health risks associated with fracking operations.
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11/16/2017: How's the chicken business though?

We step away from the Hill to talk to someone who will be affected by the tax bill: a poultry company CEO (and former economist) in Rogers, Arkansas, for whom tax cuts could allow a business expansion a year or so earlier than would be possible at the current tax rate. And we check in with Lizzie O'Leary, on the ground in San Juan, Puerto Rico, about how the island is rebuilding two months after Hurricane Maria.
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11/17/2017: Taxes, trade deficits and peanut butter

On today's Weekly Wrap, we're consumed by tax reform and discuss voodoo economics, which is a euphemism for trickle-down economics coined by a Republican. Then it's on to President Trump's goal to reduce the U.S. trade deficit and whether or not the tax plan could further that. And in Zimbabwe, negotiations continue for a political settlement after Tuesday's intervention by the country's military. Finally, we play a clip from this season of The Uncertain Hour about how one ordinary citizen helped change the peanut butter industry.
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11/20/2017: You can't spell antitrust without AT&T

You might have seen it coming. President Donald Trump decided not to reappoint Janet Yellen to a second term chairing the Federal Reserve, and today Yellen announced she's leaving the Fed completely once her successor is confirmed. The way terms of the board of governors are set up, she could have stayed for another seven years. We'll talk about what's next for her and the central bank. Then, we'll bring you the latest on the $85 billion merger between AT&T and Time Warner, which the Justice Department is trying to block.
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11/21/2017: It's an odd moment to talk about net neutrality

Federal Communications Commission Chairman Ajit Pai said today he's going to ask the commission, which is split along party lines in favor the GOP, to get rid of Obama-era rules around net neutrality and adopt a more free-market approach. The move comes at a confusing time for telecommunications policy in this country, and we'll talk about it. Then: About 60,000 Haitians living in the United States are trying to figure out what's next.
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11/22/2017: Regulations. Can't live with 'em, can't run an economy without 'em.

You might have to eat a few veggies before feasting on carbs and butter and sweets, but we're going to try and serve up a good show for you. We promise. In this case, the vegetables are federal regulations, which might seem super boring but actually affect your life every single day. Case in point: Net neutrality. Federal Communications Commission Chair Ajit Pai is on his way to rolling back virtually all the net neutrality rules his agency put in place just a couple years ago. But before rules become official, there's supposed to be a comment period.
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11/23/2017: Would you rather deal with Santa traffic or online traffic?

It is now officially holiday shopping season. According to a recent survey, 91 percent of people who said they'd be shopping this holiday weekend are going to do at least some of it online. However, shopping online doesn't mean you can skip all the crowds, online traffic is proving to be an issue for popular retail websites. If you are one of those people that will still go to the mall this holiday season, chances are you will see a line of people waiting to take their picture with Santa Claus. Santa visits are a big draw and can translate into big sales for retailers.
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11/24/2017: Let's do the numbers on Black Friday

We've got a whole bunch of stories about America's biggest shopping holiday: From communities recovering after a long storm season, to shoppers in Korea trying to get in on the action. Then we talk with PayPal President Dan Schulman to get his perspective on this year's shopping season and the continuing rise of mobile payments. Plus: While we're all rushing around to stores, Congress is enjoying one more day of rest before a frenzy of their own: Passing the tax bill before the end of the year.
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